2012 Harvest Blues Acoustic Room

All The Artists will appear at the Market House in the Acoustic Room

Afternoon , Evening and Nightime shows, finished by 11pm

The-Acoustic-Room

Be sure to check out the Harvest Blues Booklet available at the event

Booklet-2


Kris Dolimore

chrisdolimoreKris’s guitar skills have always been admired in whichever genre he has played. Now those skills are honed to perfection and they need to be, he has chosen a field where his playing is at its most exposed. A man, a guitar and a voice; no room for error and nowhere to hide. With a largely acoustic repertoire, precision playing is expected and delivered.

During a career in music, spanning more than four decades, Kris Dollimore has graced some of the world’s greatest stages and has played with many international bands and artists including The Godfathers, The Damned, Dee Dee Ramone, Johnny Thunders, Adam Ant and Del Amitri. He can also include Johnny Depp, David Bowie and Chrissie Hynde amongst his many admirers.

Kris took the decision to perform as a solo artist seven years ago and has toured relentlessly, travelling the length and breadth of the UK and Europe. He has released three solo albums to date, all receiving great critical acclaim.

Please visit Kris Dolimores’ website and their Facebook page.
Playing  : Saturday 7th: 1-4pm & 7-10pm and Sunday 8th: 1-4pm & 6-9pm


Kelly Joe Phelps – Vancouver

kelly joeSince his debut album ‘Lead Me On’, came out in 1994, the Pacific Northwest based singer and songwriter has written and performed some of the most compelling slide guitar based music ever recorded. Though he spent his early years playing free jazz, he has never strayed too far from the roots music world that has become his passion. “I’d spent all this time learning improvisational music, but I’d always had an attraction to folk based music forms. So, I was listening to a lot of Chet Atkins, Merle Travis and some of the newer people like Leo Kottke and John Fahey. My music is a reflection of all the music I loved and steeped myself in. There’s a space and openness in rural music that makes sense to me.” Playing a lap slide in a style that both evoked the sounds of the ancients and pointed towards new possibilities for the instrument, Kelly Joe’s music seemed to originate in another time as he sang with the voice of an old soul, weary with experience, yet excited with all of the prospects that life brings.

Kelly Joe Phelps plays, sings, and writes the blues. HOLD UP before you lock that in – forget about songs in a twelve bar three chord progression with a two line repeat and answer rhyme structure – though he can certainly do that when he wants to. I’m talking about a feeling, a smoky, lonesome, painful – yet somehow comforting groove that lets you know that you are not alone – even when you’re blue. Play on brother.” – Steve Earle

I first became aware of Kelly Joe Phelps when my daughter (who was 9 or 10 at the time) brought home a cd (‘Lead Me On’) from the Vancouver Folk Festival. “You might like this, Dad” she said. Boy was she right. I’ve heard Kelly Joe mention that he’s been inspired by people like Roscoe Holcomb, Robert Pete Williams, Dock Boggs, Mississippi Fred McDowell, and others. He seems to have absorbed all this (and all kinds of other stuff as well) and come back with something all his own. Sounds like he’s coming from the inside out. The bottom up. He’s not just playing ‘AT’ the music or trying to recreate or imitate something that’s happened in the past. He seems to have tapped into the artery somehow. There’s a lot going on in between and behind the notes. Mystery. He’s been an inspiration to me.” – Bill Frisell

When I heard Kelly Joe the first time, I was amazed how it all made so much sense. His music is a wide world with three hundred and sixty degrees of influence…. Kelly Joe is a musical slight of hand master. He pulls world wide sounds out of his guitar.”  – Tim O’Brien

Please visit Kelly Joe Phelps website and their Facebook page.

Playing  : Friday 6th: 7-10pm, Saturday 7th: 1-4pm &  Sunday 8th: 1-4pm & 6-9pm


Blind Boy Paxton

JerronPaxtonbanjoJerron Paxton comes across not as a young man in his early twenties , but he impresses with incisive understanding and wisdom far beyond his age. “I am a songster. I am not limited to the blues. I sing and play ballads, banjo tunes, fiddle tunes, rags and more.” he told thecountryblues.com. “For me, music is not an academic experiment. I play it the way I feel like it, because it should be an expression of how I see things. I am just learning to have a good time so that the audience can have a good time. Music shouldn’t be forced. It’s upsetting to me that so much music is technique, just skill and not enough feeling. I am happy to play so that the audience feels like I am in their living room. I want people to be enjoying themselves.”

Jerron Paxton masters multiple blues styles and picks like Blind Blake. He feels home in the Piedmont tradition with its ragtime influence. Country blues fans will pick up on Blind Boy Fuller, Gary Davis, but also on the swampy blues of Louisiana and the Mississippi Delta. He digs deep in the archives of the country blues, from Furry Lewis to Texas Alexander. On the piano he can remind you of Fats Waller, although he cites James P. Johnson and Lucky Robinson as influences.. He is often cited to have said that at the age of fifteen– about the time he started to go blind– that he just didn’t like anything written after 1934. He raised himself on 78s. Sound familiar?

Please visit Blind Boy Paxton website and their Facebook page.
On Stage : Friday 6th: 7-10pm, Saturday 7th: 7-10pm and Sunday 8th: 1-4pm


The Lost Brothers – Ireland

lost-boys-picThe Lost Brothers first met in an old dusty library in Liverpool, England in 2007. From their first encounter, they noticed they had a lot in common. They both come from Ireland (Oisin Leech from Navan, Mark McCausland from Omagh), and having both come from musical families, they had both played in various bands since a young age and had now come to Liverpool to seek a brighter future. The pair shared the same love of music (from the Carter Family to Sam Cooke, Mississippi John Hurt to Dion and the Bellmonts, Phil Spector to the Louvin Brothers, the Impressions to Van Morrison), and before long, were jamming together in the dive bars of Liverpool when not on the road with their bands. The pair were regular faces on the Liverpool music scene and when together, people began to call them, The Lost Brothers…

“Irish duo the Lost Brothers offered exceptional interplay between their acoustic guitars, building from deceptively simple folk structures with tight paired harmonies from their recent The Passing of the Night, while their cover of “Moon River” reinforced their affable Simon & Garfunkel style.” – THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE,DOUG FREEMAN MARCH 15TH 2013

Please visit The lost brothers website and their Facebook page.

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